How an Internet Meme Ruined a Model's Life - The Coverage
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How an Internet Meme Ruined a Model’s Life

Sources : 葉宛承 heidi yeh Facebook

Sources : 葉宛承 heidi yeh Facebook

We all love memes. They fill the Internet and make it a funnier environment. Websites like 9gag and Tumblr are full of these memes, making them some of the most visited websites in the world.
Some memes are made of animals or funny animations while some are made from picture of people.

Memes appear in the limelight for a brief interval then disappearing into the abyss of the World Wide Web. The people in the memes will often gain online social popularity and some, even, their own 15 minutes of fame on a talk show.

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For instance, the person behind the meme, ‘Ridiculously Photogenic Marathon Runner’, got himself an interview on Ellen and several other talk shows.

While most memes are flattering (like Ridiculously Photogenic Marathon Runner), some abuse an individual’s physical traits to create a character that is used as a template for jokes online.
However, Taiwanese model Heidi Yeh told BBC that becoming a viral sensation, or rather, joke, can ruin your life.

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The photo above went viral on the Internet along with a story of a man who sued his wife for lying to him about not having any plastic surgery procedures before they got married. Once they had kids, the husband who was genuinely attractive and did not have any plastic surgery procedures done, realized his wife, was lying because none of their children looked anything like their mother.

Sources : BBC

The truth of the matter is that the entire tale is pure fiction and nothing more.

A tale of fiction crafted to entertain others and who’s unfortunate popularity ruined the life of an innocent woman.

Heidi Yeh is a Taiwanese model that posed for a photo for a pro-cosmetic surgery advertisement with a man and three children. The children had their faces photo-shopped to look unattractive. The ad read: “The only thing you’ll ever have to worry about is how to explain it to the kids.”

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Yeh’s photo found its way online and the Internet went wild with the fabricated story of the deceitful wife who had plastic surgery and tricked a man into marrying her.

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She was told that the picture would only be used in one print media outlet but was shocked to find that the photo went viral online with a completely untrue story.

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While her personal life suffered, the meme’s biggest blow was to the model’s career. Yeh was unable to book anything but small gigs after the photo went viral, because no casting agent believed that she never had plastic surgery.Even after the meme’s popularity died down, nobody would still hire her.

To date, Yeh has only gotten small gigs and is barely making enough to support herself.
The story was so widely circulated and translated to so many languages that no one bothered to find its source or validate its accuracy.

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“People actually believed it and thought this has happened to me!’ Said Yeh. “Even my relatives and fiancée’s family have even asked me about it.”

The depressed model says that her troubles have been keeping her up at night and she still wonders why this unfortunate stroke of bad luck has taken a rude entrance into her life.

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